Earth Economics Staff | 05.10.2018

05.11.2018 | Cheri Jensen & Cyrus Philbrick

As we approach mid-May National Bike Month is officially in full swing. Bike Everywhere Month, as it's known here in Washington state, is the perfect opportunity for Earth Economics staff to not only get outside but also to promote the environmental, social, and health benefits of pedal power.

 Jean Jensen, Team Captain of The Natural Capitalists

Jean Jensen, Team Captain of The Natural Capitalists

As participants in Washington’s Bike Everywhere Challenge, our team – The Natural Capitalists – has already logged about 160 miles of heart-pumping, carbon-free, wind-in-the-face transportation. We're all trying to keep up with our Executive Director, Matt. 

  Two days a week Matt bikes from his Green Lake home to downtown Seattle, hops on the Tacoma-Seattle bus, and then bikes the final 1.5 miles to the office. Then he does the reverse. Last year, he pedaled about 1500 carbon free miles commuting to and from work. That’s not counting the thousands more that he spent riding with his family to school or just riding for fun.

Two days a week Matt bikes from his Green Lake home to downtown Seattle, hops on the Tacoma-Seattle bus, and then bikes the final 1.5 miles to the office. Then he does the reverse. Last year, he pedaled about 1500 carbon free miles commuting to and from work. That’s not counting the thousands more that he spent riding with his family to school or just riding for fun.

As you buckle that helmet for the nation-wide Bike to Work Day on May 18, swing by the Celebration Station on the University of Washington – Tacoma Campus from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Join us and the UWT Sustainability Committee as we co-host the ultimate pit-stop on Pacific Avenue. Come by for a high-five, a cup of Victrola coffee, and to learn about how eco-commuting reduces your carbon footprint.

Does a mile really make that much of a difference?

The answer is yes! It’s estimated that every one mile biked saves about 0.9 lbs of CO2 emissions compared to driving alone in an average car. Add up all the bikers participating just here in Washington and breathe in the difference that one mile can make.

So far the Challenge has drawn over 7,600 participants state-wide who are collectively closing in on half a million miles pedaled. That equates to about 450,000 pounds of CO2 emissions saved if all those biked miles were driven in individual vehicles. And there are still 20 days left in May!